JMIR Cardio

Cardiovascular medicine with focus on electronic, mobile, and digital health approaches in cardiology and for cardiovascular health

Editor-in-Chief:

Gunther Eysenbach, MD, MPH, FACMI


JMIR Cardio is an open access journal. It covers electronic / digital health approaches in cardiology and for cardiovascular health, which includes ehealth and mhealth approaches for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular conditions.

JMIR Cardio is also the official journal of the European Congress on eCardiology and eHealth. Best papers presented at the conference are selected for JMIR Cardio and as official partner organization, JMIR authors receive a discount (Promo Code: JMIRECARDIO17).

JMIR Cardio is indexed in PubMed and PubMed Central.

Recent Articles

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Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

A strong association exists between consuming a healthy diet and lowering cholesterol levels among individuals with high cholesterol. However, implementing and sustaining a healthy diet in the real world is a major challenge. Digital technologies are at the forefront of changing dietary behavior on a massive scale, as they can reach broad populations. There is a lack of evidence that has examined the benefit of a digital nutrition intervention, especially one that incorporates nutrition education, meal planning, and food ordering, on cholesterol levels among individuals with dyslipidemia.

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Heart Failure Self-Management

Patients with heart failure (HF) in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) have 30-day hospital readmission rates as high as 43%. A virtual cardiovascular care program, consisting of patient selection, initial televisit, postconsultation care planning, and follow-up televisits, was developed and delivered by Heartbeat Health, Inc., a cardiovascular digital health company, to 11 SNFs (3510 beds) in New York. The impact of this program on the expected SNF 30-day HF readmission rate is unknown, particularly in the COVID-19 era.

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Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

Professional society guidelines are emerging for cardiovascular care in cancer patients. However, it is not yet clear how effectively the cancer survivor population is screened and treated for cardiomyopathy in contemporary clinical practice. As electronic health records (EHRs) are now widely used in clinical practice, we tested the hypothesis that an EHR-based cardio-oncology registry can address these questions.

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Telemonitoring in Cardiology

Virtual care has historically faced barriers to widespread adoption. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has necessitated the rapid adoption and expansion of virtual care technologies. Although the intense and prolonged nature of the COVID-19 pandemic has renewed people’s interest in health systems resilience, which includes how services adapt or transform in response to shocks, evidence regarding the role of virtual care technologies in health systems resilience is scarce.

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Novel Sensors and Data Acquisition Methods in Cardiology

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a condition in which a person’s airway is obstructed during sleep, thus disturbing their sleep. People with OSA are at a higher risk of developing heart problems. OSA is commonly treated with a positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy device, which is used during sleep. The PAP therapy setup provides a good opportunity to monitor the heart health of people with OSA, but no simple, low-cost method is available for the PAP therapy device to monitor heart rate (HR).

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Novel Sensors and Data Acquisition Methods in Cardiology

Heart failure (HF) management guided by the measurement of intracardiac and pulmonary pressure values obtained through innovative permanent intracardiac microsensors has been recently proposed as a valid strategy to individualize treatment and anticipate hemodynamic destabilization. These sensors have potential to reduce patient hospitalization rates and optimize quality of life.

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Cardiac Arrhythmia, Atrial Fibrillation

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia in the adult population. AF is associated with a poor quality of life (QoL) and, in many patients, current medical treatments are inadequate in alleviating AF symptoms (eg, palpitations). Patients often present with symptom preoccupation in terms of symptom fear, avoidance, and control behaviors. Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy is effective for treating other somatic disorders but has never been evaluated in patients with AF.

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Patient Satisfaction and Quality of Care in Cardiology and Digital Cardiology

The internet has become a popular platform for patients to obtain information and to review the health care providers they interact with. However, little is known about the digital footprint of vascular surgeons and their interactions with patients on social media.

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Cardiac Risk and Cardiac Risk Calculators

Current atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) predictive models have limitations; thus, efforts are underway to improve the discriminatory power of ASCVD models.

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Cardiac Arrhythmia, Atrial Fibrillation

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia during critical illness, representing a sepsis-defining cardiac dysfunction associated with adverse outcomes. Large burdens of premature beats and noisy signal during sepsis may pose unique challenges to automated AF detection.

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Cardiac Arrhythmia, Atrial Fibrillation

Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are at a higher risk for atrial fibrillation (AF). Consumer wearable heart rate (HR) sensors may be a means for passive HR monitoring in patients with AF.

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Mobile Apps for Cardiology

The use of mobile health (mHealth) interventions, including smartphone apps, for the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) has demonstrated mixed results for obesity, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, and hypertension management. A major factor attributing to the variation in mHealth study results may be mHealth user engagement.

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