JMIR Cardio

Cardiovascular medicine with focus on electronic, mobile, and digital health approaches in cardiology and for cardiovascular health

Editor-in-Chief:

Gunther Eysenbach, MD, MPH, FACMI


JMIR Cardio is an open access journal. It covers electronic / digital health approaches in cardiology and for cardiovascular health, which includes ehealth and mhealth approaches for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular conditions.

JMIR Cardio is also the official journal of the European Congress on eCardiology and eHealth. Best papers presented at the conference are selected for JMIR Cardio and as official partner organization, JMIR authors receive a discount (Promo Code: JMIRECARDIO17).

JMIR Cardio is indexed in PubMed and PubMed Central.

Recent Articles

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Cardiac Rehabilitation

Poor patient uptake of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) remains a challenge for multiple reasons including geographic, time, cultural, cost, and psychological constraints.

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Heart Failure Self-Management

Heart failure (HF) is a highly prevalent chronic condition that places a substantial burden on patients, families, and health care systems worldwide. Recent advances in mobile health (mHealth) technologies offer great opportunities for supporting many aspects of HF self-care. There is a need to better understand patients’ adoption of and interest in using mHealth for self-monitoring and management of HF symptoms.

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Hypertension Prevention and Treatment

High blood pressure or hypertension is a vastly prevalent chronic condition among adults that can, if not appropriately treated, contribute to several life-threatening secondary diseases and events, such as stroke. In addition to first-line medication, self-management in daily life is crucial for tertiary prevention and can be supported by mobile health apps, including medication reminders. However, the prescription of medical apps is a relatively novel approach. There is limited information regarding the determinants of acceptance of such mobile health (mHealth) apps among patients as potential users and physicians as impending prescribers in direct comparison.

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Novel Sensors and Data Acquisition Methods in Cardiology

The health benefits of urban green space have been widely reported in the literature; however, the biological mechanisms remain unexplored, and a causal relationship cannot be established between green space exposure and cardiorespiratory health.

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Telemonitoring in Cardiology

Mobile health (mHealth) is an emerging field of scientific interest worldwide. Potential benefits include increased patient engagement, improved clinical outcomes, and reduced health care costs. However, mHealth is often studied in projects or trials, and structural implantation in clinical practice is less common.

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Cardiac Self-Management

eHealth can revolutionize the way self-management support is offered to chronically ill individuals such as those with a cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, patients’ fluctuating motivation to actually perform self-management is an important factor for which to account. Tailoring and personalizing eHealth to fit with the values of individuals promises to be an effective motivational strategy. Nevertheless, how specific eHealth technologies and design features could potentially contribute to values of individuals with a CVD has not been explicitly studied before.

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Telemonitoring in Cardiology

Guideline-directed medical therapy (GDMT), optimized to target doses, improves health outcomes in patients with heart failure. However, GDMT remains underused, with <25% of patients receiving target doses in clinical practice. A randomized controlled trial was conducted at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre in Toronto to compare a remote GDMT titration intervention with standard in-office titration. This randomized controlled trial found that remote titration increased the proportion of patients who achieved optimal GDMT doses, decreased the time to dose optimization, and reduced the number of essential clinic visits. This paper presents findings from the qualitative component of the mixed methods study, which evaluated the implementation of the remote titration intervention.

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Mobile Apps for Cardiology

The American Heart Association has identified poor mental health as a key barrier to healthy behavior change for those with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes. Digital mental health interventions, like those delivered via the internet to computers or smartphones, may provide a scalable solution to improving the mental and physical health of this population. Happify is one such intervention and has demonstrated evidence of efficacy for improving aspects of mental health in both the general population and in users with chronic conditions.

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Cardiac Arrhythmia, Atrial Fibrillation

Although the American Heart Association and other professional societies have recommended shared decision-making as a way for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) or atrial flutter to make informed decisions about using anticoagulation (AC), the best method for facilitating shared decision-making remains uncertain.

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Reviews on Cardiovascular Health and Medicine

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk communication is a challenge for clinical practice, where physicians find it difficult to explain the absolute risk of a CVD event to patients with varying health literacy. Converting the probability to heart age is increasingly used to promote lifestyle change, but a rapid review of biological age interventions found no clear evidence that they motivate behavior change.

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Novel Sensors and Data Acquisition Methods in Cardiology

Measurement of heart rate (HR) through an unobtrusive, wrist-worn optical HR monitor (OHRM) could enable earlier recognition of patient deterioration in low acuity settings and enable timely intervention.

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Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

eHealth interventions are developed to support and facilitate patients with lifestyle changes and self-care tasks after being diagnosed with a cardiovascular disease (CVD). Creating long-lasting effects on lifestyle change and health outcomes with eHealth interventions is challenging and requires good understanding of patient values.

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Preprints Open for Peer-Review

There are no preprints available for open peer-review at this time. Please check back later.

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