JMIR Cardio

Cardiovascular medicine with focus on electronic, mobile, and digital health approaches in cardiology and for cardiovascular health

Editor-in-Chief:

Gunther Eysenbach, MD, MPH, FACMI


JMIR Cardio is an open access journal. It covers electronic / digital health approaches in cardiology and for cardiovascular health, which includes ehealth and mhealth approaches for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular conditions.

JMIR Cardio is also the official journal of the European Congress on eCardiology and eHealth. Best papers presented at the conference are selected for JMIR Cardio and as official partner organization, JMIR authors receive a discount (Promo Code: JMIRECARDIO17).

JMIR Cardio is indexed in PubMed and PubMed Central.

Recent Articles

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Telemonitoring in Cardiology

The prevalence of obesity is rising. Most previous studies that examined the relations between BMI and physical activity (PA) measured BMI at a single timepoint. The association between BMI trajectories and habitual PA remains unclear.

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Heart Failure Self-Management

Mobile apps have the potential to support patients with heart failure and facilitate disease self-management, but this area of research is recent and rapidly evolving, with inconsistent results for efficacy. So far, most of the published studies evaluated the feasibility of a specific app or assessed the quality of apps available in app stores. Research is needed to explore patients’ and clinicians’ perspectives to guide app development, evaluation, and implementation into models of care.

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Heart Failure Self-Management

The COVID-19 pandemic forced several European governments to impose severe lockdown measures. The reduction of physical activity during the lockdown could have been deleterious.

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Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

Shared decision-making is an essential principle for the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD), where asymptomatic people consider lifelong medication and lifestyle changes.

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Reviews on Cardiovascular Health and Medicine

Adult chronic heart failure mainly affects an elderly population with multiple comorbidities that often require frequent medical visits to prevent poor health outcomes. However, the heart failure disease process reduces their independence by reducing mobility, exercise tolerance, and cognitive decline. Remote care technologies can bridge the gap in care for these patients by allowing them to be followed up within the comfort of their home and encourage their self-care. However, patients, carers, and health care professionals need to engage with the technology for it to be useful.

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Reviews on Cardiovascular Health and Medicine

Heart failure self-management is essential to avoid decompensation and readmissions. Mobile apps seem promising in supporting heart failure self-management, and there has been a rapid growth in publications in this area. However, to date, systematic reviews have mostly focused on remote monitoring interventions using nonapp types of mobile technologies to transmit data to health care providers, rarely focusing on supporting patient self-management of heart failure.

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Telemonitoring in Cardiology

Heart transplant selection committee meetings have transitioned from in-person to remote video meetings during the COVID-19 pandemic, but how this impacts committee members and patient outcomes is unknown.

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Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

Despite widespread education, many individuals fail to follow basic health behaviors such as consuming a healthy diet and exercising. Positive changes in lifestyle habits are associated with improvements in multiple cardiometabolic health risk factors, including lipid levels. Digital lifestyle interventions have been suggested as a viable complement or potential alternative to conventional health behavior change strategies. However, the benefit of digital preventive interventions for lipid levels in a preventive health context remains unclear.

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Heart Failure Self-Management

Patients admitted with decompensated heart failure (HF) are at risk for hospital readmission and poor quality of life during the discharge period. Lifestyle behavior modifications that promote the self-management of chronic cardiac diseases have been associated with an improved quality of life. However, whether a mobile health (mHealth) program can assist patients in the self-management of HF during the acute posthospital discharge period is unknown.

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Coronary Heart Disease

Pre- and postoperative anxiety is a common phenomenon associated with negative postoperative outcomes. Symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, such as fear, nightmares, and sleep deprivation, are prevalent in approximately 30% to 50% of patients following discharge from intensive care units after cardiac surgery. Preliminary evidence suggests a promising role of virtual reality (VR) in preventing stress-related reactions using stress inoculation training. Such training enables cognitive preparation of individuals for stressful situations, thereby becoming more tolerant and resistant to stress, subsequently reducing the risk of potential negative psychological consequences. This study investigated a preoperative VR app—Pre-View—aimed at better informing and preparing patients for cardiac catheterization.

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Cardiac Rehabilitation

Poor patient uptake of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) remains a challenge for multiple reasons including geographic, time, cultural, cost, and psychological constraints.

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